Jamie Frater

Jamie Frater

Free Formula: An Homage To Or Du Serail

Bertrand Duchafour is my favourite living perfumer and in particular I love his Or Du Serail for Naomi Goodsir. One weekend I was bored and decided to play around with a bunch of formulas and see if I could make something as sweet and beautiful as the opening of this brilliant scent. I was somewhat successful and while I have not spent any time editing this formula, I thought it might be fun to publish something that is a work-in-progress.

Free Formula: Modern Rose Chypre

This is the first fragrance I ever created! Well, it’s the nth iteration of said fragrance. The very first instance was just three ingredients: patchouli acetate, Dorinia SAE, and hydroxycitronellal in the form of Firmenich’s Cyclosia base. I had mixed the three together in the proportions found in this fragrance and dipped a smelling stick into it. Hours later I walked into the room I had left it in and was met with the most magical and profoundly beautiful scent.

Clone Formula: Coty Chypre

Chypre by Coty is one of the most important works of fragrance art in history. It inspired thousands of new fragrances and continues to do so today, and it was a nod, in its own time, to the long-lost scent of powdered wigs and the drawing rooms of the European Gentry of the 17th and 18th centuries.

Free Formula: Sublime Ylang Perfume

I happen to be a huge fan of Ylang Ylang and had a great love for the fragrance Sublime by Jean Patou which is built around an Ylang Ylang and Mandarin accord. Rather than analyzing and making a clone, I wanted to come up with my own version so I could be more playful. And so while this formula is called Sublime Ylang and follows the notes and much of the style of the Patou fragrance, this is created without any GCMS analysis of the original.

Clone Formula: Twilly d’Hermès

Twilly is a tuberose bomb which opens with a blast of bright fresh ginger. It features an interesting tuberose based around lactonic notes (rather than medicinal notes) resting in a sultry bed of vanilla and amber. Today we have launched the formula for purchase!

Clone Formula: M7 by Yves Saint Laurent

The content of M7 encompasses assorted trees and raw, odorous plants. The composition begins with elegant citrus notes of Italian bergamot, Sicilian mandarin and rosemary. The warm heart contains an excellent replica of one of the most expensive components: Agarwood, followed by vetiver. The perfume closes with a soft ambergris trail and musky notes.

Clone Formula: Patou Pour Homme Privé

Patou Pour Homme Privé is my signature fragrance, I have spent untold hours wearing this scent and considering its many nuances. I have bought numerous bottles at great cost (of both the eau de toilette and aftershave) and have had more than one GCMS analysis performed. This “clone” formula of Patou Pour Homme Privé is out of this world and, should you wish to play around with the data yourself, it makes a great starting point for experimentation.

Clone Formula: Helmut Lang Eau de Cologne

Maurice Roucel is the nose behind the skanky and outrageous fragrance Musc Ravageur. In an interview discussing the fragrance, he admitted that despite its name, it ironically had no musk in it. His true musk fragrance was Eau de Cologne for Helmut Lang presented here. This has amazing diffusion and is a graunchy animalic musk bomb; it is unlike anything else you’ll have smelled before (unless you’ve smelled the original).

Clone Formula: Dior Eau Sauvage

First off, to be clear, this is not the modern Sauvage from Dior featuring Johnny Depp. This is the original 1966 Edmond Roudnitska masterpiece cologne: the first mass market fragrance to use the glorious power of hedione, newly discovered and captive by Firmenich at the time.

Free Formula: Oud Chypre

This is the formula for a fragrance I make for my own use. It is full of ingredients that are outright banned from commercial use and quantities of luxury materials that are simply beyond the pocket book of most people. I found this at some point in my travels through various perfumery books or websites and, for the life of me, I cannot remember the source! If someone recognizes this please let me know in the comments so I can post an attribution. I am publishing this formula for Roberto who asked for something Oud related.

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